Posts Tagged ‘rent increase’

B.C. Landlord Rent Increase Guideline for 2016 is 2.9%

Friday, January 8th, 2016

bc landlords rent increase for 2016British Columbia Landlords – The 2016 Rent Increase Guideline is 2.9%

Are you going to raise the rent in 2016? As costs rise many BC landlords are going to raise the rent and want to know how much they can raise rents in 2016.

British Columbia landlords can raise the rent only one annually. Furthermore the rents can only be raised by amount allowed by provincial law. Landlords also must provide their tenants with at least three months notice and use the property forms. The rent increase is a percentage equal to the rate of inflation plus 2%. For more information see the province website here: Rent Increases

A 45% Rent Increase? Vancouver Seniors Fight Back

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

February 23rd, 2012

 

Seniors who live in an East Vancouver rental building have decided to fight their landlord’s attempt to get a 45% increase in rent.

Many of the seniors or living on pensions and state if would be destroy their finances if the rent increase went forward.

Tenant Adeline Saunders is 57 and has rheumatoid arthritis.  She says her disability pension barely covers her current expenses and if the rent goes up she will be in a very difficult situation: choosing between hearing her apartment or paying for food.

The tenants admit the landlord has put double windows in.  They also admit the building is being renovated with security upgrades added.

Renter Andy Lai said it’s unbelievable the landlord could attempt to raise the rent so high.  In British Columbia the normal allowable rent increase is 4.3%.  In Ontario rents are going to be capped at 2.5% no matter what inflation is in 2013.  See here.  In Alberta you can raise the rent as much as you want.

The landlord has applied to the BC Residential Tenancy Branch to raise the rent higher than the allowable 4.3% increase because rents there are below market value.

The landlord claims that while rents are currently at $355/month for a bachelor suite, the market rent should be $740.

 

MPP issues bill to address rent control exemption

Friday, June 17th, 2011

The Ontario Landlord Association calls it “irresponsible”

After receiving a complaint from a constituent about a steep rent hike, Norm Sterling introduced a Bill late last month to address a little known part of the Residential Tenancies Act that prevents rent control on properties constructed after 1991. (more…)

The Toronto Sun: Ontario Rent Hike Lowest in 35 Years

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Ontario’s rent hike lowest in 35 years

By ANTONELLA ARTUSO, Queen’s Park Bureau Chief
Last Updated: January 2, 2011 5:20pm

Ontario rents will be allowed to edge up by only 0.7% in 2011.

It is the lowest increase in the 35-year history of the province’s rent guideline — the maximum annual rent increase allowable without seeking special approval from the Landlord and Tenant Board for a heftier hike.

“The McGuinty government is providing real protection for tenants by linking the rent increase guideline to the Ontario Consumer Price Index which prevents routine rent increases above the rate of inflation while ensuring landlords can recover increases in their costs,” said Liberal cabinet minister Jim Bradley.

Stuart Henderson, a moderator with the Ontario Landlords Association, which typically represents property owners with less than five units for rent, said the tiny increase has many of the group’s members wondering if they can afford to stay in the business.

“We’re the ones that are paying all these new costs — the price of gas, hydro, the HST — and then we kind of get kicked in the stomach with a 0.7% increase,” he said. “It leaves kind of the worst landlords in the market, people who are renting out fire traps, illegal places.”

The next provincial election will be held in October, and Henderson said the McGuinty government is clearly currying favour with tenants.

“It’s political opportunism,” he charged. “We feel that the McGuinty government is trying to protect against a backlash from tenants in Toronto.”

Geordie Dent, executive director of the Federation of Metro Tenants’ Associations, said landlords may be complaining now but they weren’t protesting when the province allowed yearly increases in the range of 5% in the 1990s.

The recession has been very hard on many tenants, and unemployment in Toronto continues to hover at about 10%, he said.

”It’s not renting out a movie at Blockbusters — it’s people’s housing,” Dent said. “Any increase right now during this difficult time is hard for any tenant.”

Also, Ontario does not have “real” rent control because the landlord is only obliged to follow the guideline for an existing tenant, he said.

“If you move into a unit, though, a landlord can charge you whatever he wants,” Dent said. “The last tenant could have been paying $500 a month and they can charge you $2,000.”

http://www.torontosun.com/news/canada/2011/01/02/16734661.html