Posts Tagged ‘bad tenant’

BC Landlords Want To Hear From BC Tenants – How Can We Improve The British Columbia Rental Industry?

Friday, October 6th, 2017

BC Landlords BC Tenants Win Win Campaign

Landlords and Tenants: Let’s Work Together To Improve the British Columbia Rental Industry

There has been a lot debate on the state of the BC rental industry recently. Everything from landlords dealing with serious damages to their rental properties and tenants who don’t pay rent and rent increases that are too low to tenants complaining about ‘renovictions‘ and the high cost of rent.

Because this our landlord members have come together to try to get past all the confusion and want to work with BC tenants to form solutions. The reality is good landlords are looking for good tenants and good tenants are looking for good landlords and high quality, affordable rental housing. So let’s make this happen! 

BC Tenants Let Your Voices Be Heard By Small BC Landlords

Many of the rental properties in our province are due to the investment of small investors who become small landlords. Some people call us “mom and pop” landlords but whatever you call us we are the stake holders who have invested our hard earned money into BC rental properties.

Many Small Landlords Were Renters Not That Long Ago

You won’t usually see this in the media, but the reality is many small landlords were renting ourselves not that long ago. We rented while studying at university or while looking for a job. So we know how important it is for landlords to offer high quality, afford housing from our first hand, personal experiences.

A Vancouver landlord wrote in:

“I invested in my condo and made sure it was exactly the type of place I always wanted to rent. I also want to make sure I’m the ideal landlord who is service oriented and caring. Did anyone see that silly movie a few years ago called “Hot Tub Time Machine”? Well if I could go back in time I would want to rent from me now.”

Let’s Get More People Investing and Creating High Quality Rentals

Good landlords know it’s important for us to have high quality, well-maintained properties that will attract good paying tenants. We also need to make sure we have fair rules that will lead more good people to invest.

A Surrey landlord explained her goals and why she became a landlord:

“As a small business owner I don’t have a pension. My rental property is to protect me and help me when I’m retired. Nothing nefarious here, only my investment property and my hope to keep finding good renters who appreciate me and respect the rental property.”

In What Ways Do BC Tenants Want to Improve the BC Rental Industry?

Help us help you by providing your thoughts and opinions on how we can improve the BC rental industry.

1. What are you looking for when choosing a rental property?

2. How important is it for you to be near public transportation?

3. Where is your “go to” place to look for a rental?

4. What qualities are you looking for in a landlord?

5. Do you have any thoughts or opinions on improving the BC rental industry?

Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at and let us know your answers to these questions or about anything else to improve the BC rental industry. We won’t edit or censor anything and are looking for your side of things.

British Columbia Landlords and Tenants Working Together For Success

Both landlords and tenants play an important role in the success of our province. Let’s work together to make things better and improve the BC rental industry for years to come.

Stacking the deck against Ontario landlords

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Stacking the deck against Ontario landlords

Remember the early-’90’s thriller Pacific Heights? A young San Francisco couple buy their dream house and rent out a portion to help pay the mortgage. When slick Carter Hayes — played by an oddly menacing Michael Keaton — rolls up in a Porsche and fancy suit, he seems like the perfect tenant. Twenty minutes later, Hayes becomes a slippery cockroach-breeding con artist who changes the locks on his door and quickly becomes a domestic bête noire.

It’s a made-up Hollywood tale — yet an instructive one. Consider that if Carter Hayes took up residence in an Ontario apartment building, the province’s 2007 Residential Tenancies Act would make it very difficult for his landlord to kick him out. Who knows: He might even be able to claim his cockroaches as protected “pets.”

The law appears to have been drafted on the assumption that all landlords are rich and greedy. Under the Act, a tenant can allow anyone to move into his or her unit indefinitely. So after you sign a lease for, say, a one-bedroom apartment, you can invite your unemployed buddies to come stay with you — forever. The Act does not require you to give names, addresses or references to the landlord. Even if you decide to move out, the scrubs can stay behind until they are formally evicted, which requires a court order … which, in some cases, the landlord cannot obtain because he doesn’t even know what name to put on the eviction notice.

Oh, and if your tenants feel like trashing the apartment à la Charlie Sheen while they live there — or just before they leave — they can. Tenants in Ontario are not required to pay a damage deposit, so if a tenant damages the property and the landlord discovers this when (or just after) the lease is up, the landlord has to spend his own time and money taking them to Small Claims Court. However, since tenants don’t have to give a forwarding address, the landlord can’t serve them court papers. As a result, either new tenants pay for the damage through increased rents, or (as is more likely) the landlord pays out of his own pocket.

Unlike normal contracts, Ontario residential leases are fairly meaningless unless they mirror the specifications set out in the Residential Tenancies Act exactly. For example, many landlords understandably do not want tenants with pets. Even if this restriction is expressly written into the lease, the Act allows tenants to bring in as many pets as municipal regulations allow. Which is lot: The City of Toronto Municipal Code states that a person can keep up to six of any combination of dogs, cats, ferrets and rabbits at any given time in their home.

The only thing worse than the Act is the Landlord and Tenant Board, which appears to be a body set up specifically to help tenants exploit their landlords. For example, even if a tenant just flatly refuses to pay rent, he/she is guaranteed a hearing under the Act. Further, if a tenant contacts the board and says he/she can’t make it to the hearing on the scheduled date, the hearing is postponed. This can happen repeatedly, and in the meantime the tenant continues to live rent-free in the property.

If the hearing ever happens, the tenant can completely blindside the landlord by bringing up random maintenance-deficiency claims. The claim does not have to be true or even make sense, and the tenant does not have to inform the landlord of the “deficiency” prior to the hearing. Nevertheless, on this basis, the board can award money to the tenant at the hearing — which often happens when landlords are trying to evict deadbeats.

Throughout all of this Kafkaesque ordeal, the landlord must play nice and be extra careful not to cause any offence. Repeatedly asking for the rent may be construed as “harassment” or “interference with reasonable enjoyment” of the property.

Roger Ebert called Pacific Heights “a horror film for yuppies.” But most Ontario landlords aren’t rich folks. They’re just small business people trying to get by. But thanks to the Residential Tenancies Act, they spend a lot of their time feeling as though they’re this close to …

Well, I’ll let you watch the movie.
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