Archive for the ‘Landlord BC’ Category

BC Landlords Can Raise the Rent 1.4 % in 2021

Friday, September 4th, 2020

How Much Can A Landlord in BC Raise the Rent Next Year?

British Columbia landlords can raise the rent by up to 1.4% in 2021

How is the Rent Increase Guideline Calculated?

The rate is based on inflation. Unlike in past years only the inflation rate is used.

How Does This Compare to Other Provinces?

In Ontario, landlords are faced with the 2021 rent increase being capped at 0%

How Do I Give My Tenants Notice I’m Going to Raise the Rent?

Rent increase documents are available from government Residential Tenancy Branch here

What Does the BCLA Recommend Landlords Due Regarding the Rent Increase Guideline for 2021?

We recommend BC landlords raise the rent the maximum amount of 1.4% in 2021.

BC Landlords – Run Criminal Checks For Huge Discounted Prices

Wednesday, August 5th, 2020

With So Many Problems From A Small Group of Bad Tenants Out There More Landlords Are Using Criminal Checks to Protect Their Rental Properties…And Now You Can Too For a Discounted Price!

BC landlords are excited about how many great tenants are out there.  These are tenants who pay their rent on time and respect both the rental property and their landlord in a mature and professional manner.

Many BC landlords have faced problems with their tenants during the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s now more important than ever to protect yourself and your property!

Take Your Tenant Screening System To A Higher Level (Not Just Credit Checks, Social Media and References)

It’s time to make sure you run criminal background checks on your potential tenants. And you can now do so with our Protection Membership.

The BC Landlords Association has brought forth a revolution in tenant screening over the past decade.

Experienced and successful landlords in our community were the ones who educated others on the importance of screening your tenants very carefully.  Before we came along there was very little talk about landlord issues and few BC landlords even knew they could run credit checks on tenants (and why they should run them).

With so many good people looking for a place to ‘call home’ and rent from you, it is essential that small landlords avoid the professional tenants out there.

These professional tenants know how to manipulate the system and can lead small landlords to not only sleepless nights, but to financial ruin.

Professional Tenants Hurt Good Tenants, Not Only Their Landlord

These types of people who make leave huge damages and owed rent behind not only hurt the landlord, it hurts good tenants who are looking for a nice rental property. Landlords who face huge financial losses often leave the industry.  Or they will raise rents to help pay for the repair costs.

Sadly, we continue to see some landlords not being careful and being ripped off by these professional tenants.

We Are Proud To Be Partners With TRITON

Triton is the leading background company in Canada.

Regular criminal check price: $59.00/check + $75.00 set up charge

BC Landlord Member Price: $24.95/check and no set up charge

And it’s all for only a one time fee (no annual fee). We landlords just like you and we know how tight the budgets are for many BC Landlords and this is why we want to keep your costs down for the best services out there.

BC Landlord Tenant Criminal Checks – Become a BC LANDLORD PROTECTION Member And You Can Add Criminal Checks To Your Tenant Screening System For A Huge Discount!

BC Rental Supplement Extended Until End Of August

Sunday, June 21st, 2020

The B.C. government is extending the temporary rental supplement until the end of August 2020 to support renters and landlords during the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to CBC News the temporary rental supplement (TRS) program provides $500 per month for eligible households with dependents and $300 per month for eligible households with no dependents. Eligible roommates are also able to apply for the supplement.

People who have already been approved for the TRS do not need to reapply, the government said in its announcement of the extension Friday. They will receive an email asking them to confirm they plan to live at the same address through July and August.

New applications will be accepted until Aug. 31 and will be eligible for a supplement for the month they are received.

“COVID-19 has touched all aspects of our lives and our economy,” Housing Minister Selina Robinson said in a statement.

“We’re continuing to protect renters as we also ensure landlords are receiving some income during this time.”

The government also said the ban on evictions for reasons other than non-payment of rent will be lifted later in June.

That will allow evictions in situations where, for example, a new owner buys the rental property and intends to move in or when a tenant is endangering the landlord or other tenants or subletting an apartment without permission, the province said.

Evictions in such situations will require a notice period of one to four months.

The province said it would provide advance notice before lifting the moratorium on evictions for non-payment of rent. Tenants will be responsible for repaying any owed rent, the statement read, but a framework will be put in place to give tenants time to repay owed rent.

Since the supplement was announced, the province said, 82,500 eligible applications for rent assistance have been submitted.

Discuss this and other vital issues in our BC Landlords Forum.

 

B.C. says landlords can start eviction process again, effective immediately

Wednesday, May 27th, 2020

We are all small business landlords in British Columbia who have ‘skin in the game’ just like you do.

Unlike bureaucrats who get salaries to claim to advocate for landlords as part of their job description our livelihoods depend on our rentals.

So the news landlords are allowed to start evicting tenants again, but not for failing to pay the rent, was a mixed bag.

On Wednesday, the province’s Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing said landlords can once again issue a Notice to End Tenancy for reasons other than late or missed rent payments, effective immediately.

Landlords are also once again allowed to enter a rental suite without the tenant’s consent, including for maintenance and showings, provided they give 24 hours’ notice.

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Existing Eviction Orders Can Go To Court July 2

Any landlords who have existing eviction orders can take them to court for enforcement beginning on July 2nd.

The government stressed that its moratorium on evictions related to rent, and its moratorium on rent increases, remain in effect.

Officials said they will be giving the public advanced notice before lifting those measures.

“A framework will be put in place that will require landlords to work with tenants to repay rent that is owing over a reasonable period of time,” the ministry said.

This is a good start but we need to be able to evict for non-payment asap!

It’s Important To Pay Your Rent To Your Small Landlord

Saturday, April 18th, 2020

My name is Laura and I post under my name on the BC Landlords Forum. I’ve been active there for years to try to help other tenants and give some of my advice to help small landlords too.

These are crazy times for everyone.

And while tenants are suffering it’s also important to know your landlord might be suffering too. This pandemic is hurting everyone.

We Need To Stick Together

I used to own a house and we rented our basement out years ago and it really helped us cover our mortgage. When my husband died my children were grown so I decided to sell the house and rent.

Renting has a lot of advantages.

I don’t have to worry about any maintenance issues and my landlady has a service to cut the lawn and plow the snow.  My landlord cover my utilities so she can get just one payment each month to keep things uncomplicated.

My landlady is a teacher and her husband has his own contracting company and they are terrific.

“Are You Going To Pay The Rent?”

When all this chaos started in March and the government said ‘tenants don’t have to pay rent” my landlady called me and asked me if I was going to pay the rent.

I told her “of course I will”. She was thankful and said if I needed a break just call her.

My Landlady Is Professional and Kind, And I Make Paying Rent A Priority

I’m in a pretty good situation where I don’t need to worry about buying food and my children are adults now.  I know others might not be as safe as I am.

I’m going to pay the rent not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because I want to keep my excellent relationship with my landlady and know that if I don’t pay rent it could hurt her financially (and even lead to her selling this place).

Pay You Rent And If You Can’t Call Your Landlord

My landlady isn’t some big global corporation. She and her family invested and thanks to them I have a great place to stay at a great price.

Rent Strike Hits Small Landlords, Not The Corporate Landlords

-Not paying rent will just get rid of the small nice landlords who care about you.

-Not paying rent will not impact the big heartless corporations.

-The whole “rent strike” people are likely corporate landlords who want to get rid of small landlords who are their competition.  At least that’s what I think.

Stay Home and Stay Safe!

I’m so happy to have a great rental with a great landlady. I feel safe and don’t ever want to move.

With Love And Wishing Everyone Stays Safe,

Laura

 

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

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BC Landlords Speak Out: “It’s My Property And If I Don’t Want To Rent To Tenants With Pets That’s My Right!”

Sunday, January 21st, 2018

bc landlords no pets

Landlords Speak Out And Submit Their Experiences Regarding Changes in BC Rental Laws

As part of our “Let’s Improve the British Columbia Rental Industry” we have invited landlords and tenants to share their opinions on how we can make these improvements. These opinions are from individual contributors and are not the opinions of the BC Landlords Association. We believe by fostering communication between landlords and tenants we can improve the BC rental industry. Landlords and tenants can share your thoughts and opinions by emailing us at landlordtenantsolutions@groupmail.com

BC Landlords Speak Out:  It’s My Property And If I Don’t Want To Rent To Tenants With Pets That’s My Right!

This is my first contribution here and hope is will help fix this crazy debate about making “no pets” illegal for landlords in British Columbia.

First of all I will disclose that I am a businessWOMAN and a Feminist who has had to fight hard in our patriarchal system to just get to where I am now. After decades of facing male bullying, much of it under the guise of “we have no choice” rhetoric what is happening to landlords in BC this year is just more of the same. Bullying under the guise of “fairness” or whatever. It’s all coded and those who want to destroy our property rights are just using rhetoric.

This whole issue is not about pets at all, it’s about property rights. I am the one who saved for years to afford to buy a rental in the hopes it will help me in my retirement. I’m not a government bureaucrat with a gold plated pension. As a small business person I won’t get anything from the government when I retire and have to make wise investments to protect myself.

Poverty Rates For Women Over 60 Are Higher Than For Men

bc landlords womens rights povery over 60

As a woman and a Feminist soon to be in retirement age it’s especially frightening what can happen if I don’t invest and save wisely. My rental property is a key tool for me to survive.

Pets Are Being Weaponized As A Way To Take Away My Rights

As a woman I’ve seen this types of campaigns before. These type of “moral” arguements were common in the 1970s when a woman’s right to an abortion was framed as ‘evil’ even if the woman was raped!

I Don’t Want To Rent To Tenants With Pets, And It’s My Right To Make That Decision!

With the recent decision to basically end fixed term leases it looks like the “social justice warriors” and the “millennial who want everything for free” are dead set to use the “pet issue” as a tool to continue to take away property rights. They are using the tactics of communist agitator Saul Alinksy to tug at the public heartstrings instead of showing the real issue at hand.

For example, you can see Saul Alinsky’s Rule #11

This person was a notorious commie who influenced people like Hillary Clinton and Barrack Obama!  Alinksky wrote:

Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, polarize it.

Don’t try to attack abstract corporations or bureaucracies. Identify a responsible individual. Ignore attempts to shift or spread blame.

Why I Don’t Want Pets?

Am I heartless? Am I some evil Trump-like entity who want to put animals to slaughter and I profit because I own the slaughterhouse?Am I just a bad person?

No, no, no.  I’m a working grandmother who was a single mom and worked damn hard to get to a point where I can take care of myself and help my daughter who went married an abusive alcoholic and has successfully brought up three excellent children with my financial help.

bc landlords womens rights poverty

As A Landlord and a Woman Let Me Run My Rental Business As I See Fit And Don’t  Tell Me What I “Must Do!”

There are many reasons for me to refuse to rent to renters with pets.  There is no need for me to explain this or justify my actions. My whole purpose is to help me, my daughter, and my grandchildren from the type of poverty so many women and girls face in our society.  My actions and decisions as a landlord are business decisions for the property I have invested in and I own.

No Pet Clauses Are All About Big Brother (Men) Telling The Rest of What To Do (and threatening us if we disagree)

If the male social justice warriors really care about pets (which I am highly suspicious of) they should lobby the government to provide more government house that accepts pets.

bc landlords pets

The Push For “Pet Rights” Is BS. If The Push For “It’s Illegal To Refuse Pets” Really Cared They Would Demand This in Government Housing (and lobby the gov’t to build this type of housing!)

Don’t try to take away my property rights with your Saul Alinsky tactic of saying “oh, all the pets are abandoned because of private landlords.” We all know this is simply bullsh*t and if you really cared about pets you would be lobbying the government to invest in pet friendly housing and not trying to take away our landlord property rights.

Fellow BC Landlords Need to Fight Back

I worked hard to invest in my rental property and we need to fight back against the male communist millennials who want to take over our every thing we own and tell us what to do.  The male elite continue to use debatable issues such as “low vacancy” and “pets” as an emotional cover to take away the property rights of hard working people who have invested in rental property in British Columbia. Just say no.

Actually, with all the bullying all landlords must yell out “NO!”.

B.C. Landlord Rent Increase Guideline for 2016 is 2.9%

Friday, January 8th, 2016

bc landlords rent increase for 2016British Columbia Landlords – The 2016 Rent Increase Guideline is 2.9%

Are you going to raise the rent in 2016? As costs rise many BC landlords are going to raise the rent and want to know how much they can raise rents in 2016.

British Columbia landlords can raise the rent only one annually. Furthermore the rents can only be raised by amount allowed by provincial law. Landlords also must provide their tenants with at least three months notice and use the property forms. The rent increase is a percentage equal to the rate of inflation plus 2%. For more information see the province website here: Rent Increases

British Columbia Landlords: Find Good Tenants! Use Credit Checks

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

BC landlords good tenants credit check

Use our BC landlord services to Find Great Tenants And Avoid the Serial Bad Tenants Out There!

Get The Best Tenant Credit Checks Available! We Are Landlords and We Help Landlords!

ONLY A ONE-TIME SET UP FEE FOR PREMIUM CREDIT CHECKS AND THE RENTAL KIT AND MORE! 

The report of the CBC investigation of serial bad tenants is a huge wake-up call for landlords all across our province.

The report is about serial bad tenants who don’t pay rent.

It has landlords demanding a bad-tenant registry in British Columbia.

We had a Vancouver landlord email us the following:

“I also rented to some bad tenants. I was lucky they left owing only a month of rent and left the rental property pretty clean with the keys in the door.

I know see how lucky I was and will never rent to anyone without screening them properly!”

A landlord in Kelowna wrote in:

“This type of tenant scam happens all the time. Only now the media finally reported it!”

We even had an Alberta landlord write in with advice:

“Don’t wait for the government to do anything because they won’t. Make sure you check out anyone who wants to rent your property because this type of bad renter behaviour is happening not just in British Columbia.”

What Makes a Tenant A Good Tenant?

The good news is most of the tenants are there are good. These are the people you need to rent to. They treat you and your property with respect and pay the rent on time.

What is a Bad Tenant?

As we see from the CBC news report, bad tenants don’t pay the rent.

It’s also common for these types of tenants to cause damages to your rental property, leave a lot of garbage behind when they finally move, and cause a lot of drama with other tenants (and give their drama to you, the landlord).

How Can A Landlord Find Good Tenants? (And Avoid the Serial Ones)?

The most effective way is to be careful who you rent to.

A good tenant screening process includes a credit check.

It will provide you with a window on your tenant applicants financial history, as well as verify employment and past addresses.

What Will A Tenant Credit Check Show Me?

It’s exactly what successful landlords need to rent to the great tenants out there!

1. Credit Score

A credit score reveals the credit worthiness of a potential tenant.

If they have a history of paying their bills on time and being careful with the debts and finances it will result in a high credit score.

2. Current and Past Addresses

If any of the landlords had check their tenant’s credit they would have been able to see where they lived before and contacted those former landlords.

This way they would have found these tenants had a history of not-paying rent.

3. Employment

Are they currently employed? What about past employment?

4. Identification verification

Are they who they really say they are?

5. Past court judgments and other important information

Has anyone sued them and won a judgment against them? Do they owe anyone money? Are people chasing after them to try to collect debts owed?

All this is vital information about the people who are thinking of allowing into your investment property.

How Much Will This Cost?

Other groups charge members an annual fee to become a member.

Yikes! Those fees add up!

We don’t believe this is fair for small landlords.

For small landlords this large fee can add up, especially as you have to continue to pay year after year.

British Columbia Landlords – Get our services for only a one-time fee of only $99 and get access to the best credit checks available at a great price!